So Black Panther’s Wakanda is the fictional version of Zim’s Mutapa empire

Zimbabwe just got swaggy.

Chadwick Boseman, who plays Black Panther on screen has been quoted in the New York Times as saying the kingdom of Wakanda his character rules is really the fictional version of the empire of Mutapa in 15th century Zimbabwe.

Comic geeks will probably tell us they knew this but well, for some of us who, well, read science books or watched Parafini instead…  we’re amped.

An article in the NPR  by Winona Dimeo-Ediger is managing editor of Livability.com. (full here) has experts waxing lyrical about the ancient empire so little talked about in these climes except in primary school.

The empire stretched from South Africa through Zimbabwe to Zambia and Mozambique.

Edward Mabaya,associate director of Cornell’s International Institute for Food, Agriculture, and Development is quoted as saying:

Mutapa stands as a symbol of economic success through local, regional and international trade.

Its super power was that, the extensive trade inside its borders and beyond.

We recommend you read the article for the parallels. And also watch Home Team History’s video below:

Fascinating if you ask us and shows we really don’t read enough of our own history.

Apparently the downfall of the empire was civil war caused by Portuguese traders messing about and some chiefs turning to Christianity. It seems at that time a lot of Zimbabwean history was set aside and the more streamlined PR’ed slick machine of the book from the middle east took over.

Black Panther is out 16 February in Zimbabwe although ZiFM Stereo is holding a premiere on the 15th at Ster Kinekor Borrowdale.

It also stars Zimbabwe’s Danai Gurira as the badass leader of the female bodyguards and oversees intel and security for the technically advanced fictional African country of Wakanda .

But seriously, we need to get on that Mutapa thing.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 14,192 other subscribers